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Deb Gulbrandson, PT, DPT has been a physical therapist for over 42 years with experience in acute care, home health, pediatrics, geriatrics, sports medicine, and consulting to business and industry. Dr. Gulbrandson frequently presents community talks on topics related to Osteoporosis and safe ways to develop Core Strength. She is a member of the APTA Geriatric and Private Practice Sections, a Certified Osteoporosis Exercise Specialist using the Meeks Method, and is a CEEAA (Certified Exercise Expert for the Aging Adult) through the Geriatric Section of the APTA.

Hello, my name is Deb Gulbrandson. May is National Osteoporosis Month, and my colleague, Frank Ciuba, and I are creators of the upcoming remote course Osteoporosis Management on June 12-13, 2021.

Did you know that approximately half of all women and a quarter of all men will break a bone due to osteoporosis? Equally disheartening, every year about one-third of adults in the US age 65 and older will fall. Many of these falls will result in broken bones.

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Deb Gulbrandson, PT, DPT, along with Frank J Ciuba DPT, MS, is the author and instructor for a new course on osteoporisis that is launching remotely this month. Join Deb in Osteoporosis Management: A Comprehensive Approach for Healthcare Professionals!

Osteoporosis is a disease of increasingly porous bones that are at greater risk for fracture. The normal “bone remodeling” of breaking down and building up bone as we age is out of balance. Similar to a bank account with withdrawals outpacing deposits, as time goes on there is more breaking down than building back up. This leaves the bone more vulnerable for fracture.

We tend to think of Osteoporosis as an old person’s disease and in fact age is certainly a risk factor. We see a sharp decline in bone density the first few years following menopause; a withdrawal from the “bone bank account.” But let me share a startling statistic. At the age of 20 we have 98% of the bone density we will ever achieve. We achieve Peak Bone Mass by age thirty when our bones have reached their maximum strength and density.

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Deb Gulbrandson, PT, DPT is teaming up with Frank J Ciuba DPT, MS to create a new course called Osteoporosis Management: A Comprehensive Approach for Healthcare Professionals! This new course is launching remotely this July 25-26, 2020, and it emphasizes visual imagery cues which leads to enhanced performance for patients. Both course authors are trained by Sara Meeks, and have adapted her method to create this updated, evidence-based course on osteoporosis management.


How many times have you told your patients to stand up straight and stop looking down while walking? How’d that work out? Probably not so good. At best you may have noticed a temporary correction only for the patient to return to the formerly mentioned poor posture. We know that balance is affected by alignment of our trunk and spine. 1 Everyone needs to avoid falls but it’s particularly important with osteoporosis patients due to bone fragility.

We want our patients not only to move, but to move with optimal alignment. According to Fritz, et al 2 in the vhitepaper: “Walking Speed: The Sixth Vital Sign”, walking is a complex functional activity. Our ability to influence motor control, muscle performance, sensory and perceptual function, endurance and habitual activity level can result in a more efficient and safer gait.

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Osteoporosis or low bone mass is much more common than most people realize. Approximately 1 in 2 women over the age of 50 will suffer a fragility fracture in their lifetime. A fragility fracture is identified as a fracture due to a fall from a standing height. According to the US Census Bureau there are 72 million baby boomers (age 51-72) in 2019. Currently over 10 million Americans have osteoporosis and 44 million have low bone mass.

Many myths abound regarding osteoporosis. Answer these 5 questions below to test your Osteoporosis IQ. 1

1. “Men don’t get osteoporosis.”

Fact: In addition to the statistic above regarding the incidence of fractures in women, up to 1 in 4 men over the age of 50 will suffer a fragility fracture.

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Do you work with osteoporosis patients? This may be a trick question because you probably do whether you know it or not- even if you are a pediatric therapist! Osteoporosis is defined by the World Health Organization1 as a systematic skeletal disease characterized by:

  • Low bone mass
  • Micro-architectural deterioration of bone tissue
  • Consequent increase in bone fragility and susceptibility to a fracture

Osteoporosis occurs in men, women and even children. It is sometimes called the “silent disease” because often people don’t know they have it until they break a bone. And even then, compression fractures are painful only 20-30% of the time. Old fractures are often found on x-rays when a person is imaged for illnesses such as pneumonia. According to the National Osteoporosis Foundation2, about one in two women and one in four men over the age of 50 will suffer a fracture due to bone fragility. At this point in time, it is estimated 80% of patients entering Emergency Departments with a fragility fracture (a fall from a standing height) are never followed up for care.

As therapists, we see patients for a variety of diagnoses with co-morbidities but osteoporosis may not be listed. This could be because they have never been identified. We are in a prime position to screen for signs associated with the disorder. Below are the top 3 signs to look for:

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When It Comes to Bone Building Activities for Osteoporosis, there’s Weight Bearing and then there’s Weight Bearing!

Ask just about anyone on the street what one should do for osteoporosis and the typical answer is- weight bearing exercises. And they would be partially right. Weight bearing, or loading activities have been shown to increase bone density.1 But that’s not the whole story.

Regarding weight bearing exercises, the million-dollar question is, “How much weight bearing is enough to stimulate bone growth and how much is too much to compromise bone at risk for a fracture? We know that there are incidents of individuals fracturing from just their own body weight upon standing. Recently patients have been asking about heel drops and stomping, and whether they should do them. One size does not fit all.

An alternative is to focus on “odd impact” loading. A study by Nikander et al 2 targeted female athletes in a variety of sports classified by the type of loading they apparently produce at the hip region; that is, high-impact loading (volleyball, hurdling), odd-impact loading (squash-playing, soccer, speed-skating, step aerobics), high magnitude loading (weightlifting), low-impact loading (orienteering, cross-country skiing), and non-impact loading (swimming, cycling). The results showed high-impact and odd-impact loading sports were associated with the highest bone mineral density.

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In 1984, Mersheed Sinaki MD and Beth Mikkelsen, MD published a landmark article based on their research with osteoporotic women. (Yes, it was 1984 but this is one study no one would want to reproduce).1

The study follows 59 women with a diagnosis of postmenopausal spinal osteoporosis and back pain who were divided into 4 groups that included spinal Extension (E), Flexion (F), Combined (E+F), or No Therapeutic Exercises (N). Ages ranged from 49 to 60 years (mean, 56 years). Follow-up ranged from one to six years (mean for the groups, 1.4 to 2 years). All patients had follow-up spine x-rays before treatment and at follow-up, at which time any further wedging and compression fractures were recorded. Additional fractures occurred as follows:
Group E: 16%
Group F: 89%
Group E+F: 53%
Group N: 67%

This study suggests that a significantly higher number of vertebral compression fractures occur in patients with postmenopausal osteoporosis who followed a flexion based exercise program, than those using extension exercises. It also indicated that patients who did no exercises were less likely to sustain a vertebral compression fracture than those doing flexion exercises.

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The following is part three in a series documenting Deb Gulbrandson, PT, DPT's journey treating a 72 year old patient who has been living with multiple sclerosis (MS) since age 18. Catch up with Part One and Part Two of the patient case study on the Pelvic Rehab Report. Dr. Gulbrandson is a certified Osteoporosis Exercise Specialist and instructor of the Meeks Method, and she helps teach The Meeks Method for Osteoporosis course.

On Maryanne’s third visit, after reviewing her home exercises I told her that today our focus was on alignment. “In dealing with osteoporosis we want the forces that act upon our bodies to line up as optimally as possible. We have gravity providing a downward force from above and we have ground reaction forces coming up from below. Remember back to your first visit when we did the Foot Press in sitting and talked about Newton’s 3rd Law? For every action there’s an opposite and equal reaction and, how by pressing your feet down it helped you to sit straighter and gave more support to your back?” She nodded in agreement.

“Well, there’s another important component to that- one that we call optimal alignment. When we sit or stand in a flexed posture, those two opposing forces do not line up well and can put undue stress and pressure on our body, particularly the vertebral bodies.” I showed her the spine again with an increased flexion (hyper-kyphosis) in the thoracic area. “It’s normal to have a kyphosis in the thoracic spine. What we don’t want is a hyper-kyphosis. We often see the apex of the increased curve around T-7, 8, 9 levels near the bra line. We also call it the “slouch line” because from the front, that’s where we slouch in sitting. A thoracic hyper-kyphosis can lead to hyper-lordosis in the lumbar spine as the body tries to counteract the flexion forces above with extension or arching in the low back. We know that Wolff’s Law states that bone in a healthy person will adapt to the loads under which it is placed.1 But we want those loads to be optimally transmitted; otherwise the adaptation can be problematic.”

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The following is part two in a series documenting Deb Gulbrandson, PT, DPT's journey treating a 72 year old patient who has been living with multiple sclerosis (MS) since age 18. Catch up with Part one of the patient case study on the Pelvic Rehab Report here. Dr. Gulbrandson is a certified Osteoporosis Exercise Specialist and instructor of the Meeks Method, and she helps teach The Meeks Method for Osteoporosis course.

On Maryanne’s second visit, she reported she had been doing her “homework” and didn’t have any questions. Just to be sure, we reviewed them and I had her demonstrate. In Decompression position, she was lying supine with her hands on her abdomen, a common mistake I see. Usually this is due to tightness in pec minor with protracted scapulae. Patients unknowingly resort to the path of least resistance to take the strain off of the muscles. I explained to her that we want to use gravity to gently lengthen those muscles and “widen” the collarbones to allow for improved alignment. With her shoulders abducted to approximately 30 degrees and palms up, I propped a couple of small towels under her forearms which allowed her shoulders to relax into a more posterior and correct position.

“Today we begin the Re-alignment routine,” I said, “starting with the Shoulder Press.” I showed her how to gently press the back of her shoulders down into the mat without arching her lumbar spine. “As you press your shoulders down, exhale through your mouth as if you’re fogging a mirror. This will help activate your core muscles to keep your back in good alignment. Hold for 2-3 seconds, and then relax. Repeat 3 times.” Maryanne looked at me as if I’d lost my mind. “Did you say do 3 reps?” she asked. “I do 2 sets of 20 reps at the gym,” she said with obvious pride in her voice. “Yes, that’s where we start, and there are a couple of reasons. First, these are very site specific exercises which focus on the exact areas that need strengthening. Exercises done in a gym setting are often more general and usually involve compensation.  We are minimizing any compensation such as allowing your low back to arch. There is probably weakness in those upper back muscles as well as the tightness seen in your anterior chest muscles and we need to go slowly. Also, we are simultaneously stretching while we strengthen. Our society is so forward biased (we work on computers, drive cars, make beds, eat- it’s all forward, forward, forward), that the anterior muscles get tight and the upper back muscles get overstretched and weak. We need to reverse that pattern. Take a look at our younger population and their texting postures. Yikes! We will be layering on more exercises as your technique improves so you’ll be doing more than just 3 reps, I promise.”

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The following case study comes from faculty member Deb Gulbrandson, PT, DPT, a certified Osteoporosis Exercise Specialist and instructor of the Meeks Method. Join Dr. Gulbrandson in The Meeks Method for Osteoporosis on September 22-23, 2018 in Detroit, MI!

The first sight I had of my new patient was watching her being wheeled across the parking lot by her husband. A petite 72-year-old, I could see her slouched posture in the wheelchair. With the double diagnosis of osteoporosis and Multiple Sclerosis (MS) it didn’t look good. However, “Maryanne“ greeted me with a wide grin and a friendly, “I’m so excited to be here. I’ve heard good things about this program and can’t wait to get started.“

That’s what I find with my osteoporosis patients. They are highly motivated and willing to do the work to decrease their risk of a fracture. Maryanne was unusual in that she was diagnosed with MS at a very young age. She was 18 and had lived with the disease in a positive manner. She exercised 3X a week and had a caring, involved husband. They worked out at a local health club, taking advantage of the Silver Sneakers program. Maryanne was able to stand holding onto the kitchen counter but had stopped walking five years ago due to numerous falls. She performed standing transfers with her husband providing moderate to max assist. Her osteoporosis certainly put her at a high risk for fracture.

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Upcoming Continuing Education Courses

Pelvic Floor Level 2B - Annapolis, MD Satellite Course (SOLD OUT)

Jan 29, 2022 - Jan 30, 2022
Location: Lynch Physical Therapy

Oncology of the Pelvic Floor Level 1 - Remote Course

Jan 29, 2022 - Jan 30, 2022
Location: Replacement Remote Course

Postpartum Rehabilitation - Remote Course

Jan 29, 2022 - Jan 30, 2022
Location: Replacement Remote Course

Pelvic Floor Level 2B - Tampa, FL Satellite Course (SOLD OUT)

Jan 29, 2022 - Jan 30, 2022
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Pelvic Floor Level 2B - Lansdale, PA Satellite Course

Jan 29, 2022 - Jan 30, 2022
Location: Ivy Rehab (Lansdale, PA)

Pelvic Floor Level 2B - Shelby, NC Satellite Course

Jan 29, 2022 - Jan 30, 2022
Location: Ivy Rehab Physical Therapy (Shelby, NC)

Pelvic Floor Level 2B - El Paso, TX Satellite Course

Jan 29, 2022 - Jan 30, 2022
Location: Border Physical Therapy

Pelvic Floor Level 2B - Tullahoma, TN Satellite Course

Jan 29, 2022 - Jan 30, 2022
Location: TOP Rehab

Pelvic Floor Level 2B - South Jordan, UT Satellite Course

Jan 29, 2022 - Jan 30, 2022
Location: South Jordan Health Center

Pelvic Floor Level 2B - Self-Hosted

Jan 29, 2022 - Jan 30, 2022
Location: Self-Hosted Course

Coccydynia and Painful Sitting - Remote Course

Feb 4, 2022
Location: Short Form Remote Course

Athletes & Pelvic Rehabilitation - Remote Course

Feb 5, 2022 - Feb 6, 2022
Location: Replacement Remote Course

Yoga for Pelvic Pain - Remote Course

Feb 5, 2022 - Feb 6, 2022
Location: Replacement Remote Course

Pudendal Neuralgia and Nerve Entrapment - Remote Course

Feb 5, 2022 - Feb 6, 2022
Location: Replacement Remote Course

Pelvic Floor Level 1 - Los Angeles, CA Satellite Location (SOLD OUT)

Feb 5, 2022 - Feb 6, 2022
Location: Origin Physical Therapy

Pelvic Floor Level 1 - Queens, NY Satellite Location (SOLD OUT)

Feb 5, 2022 - Feb 6, 2022
Location: Hands of Hope Physical Therapy

Pelvic Floor Level 1 - Providence, RI Satellite Location (SOLD OUT)

Feb 5, 2022 - Feb 6, 2022
Location: Pappas Physical and Hand Therapy

Fertility Considerations for the Pelvic Therapist - Remote Course

Feb 5, 2022
Location: Short Form Remote Course

Pelvic Floor Level 1 - Chicago, IL Satellite Location (SOLD OUT)

Feb 5, 2022 - Feb 6, 2022
Location: Advocate Illinois Masonic Medical Center

Pelvic Floor Level 1 - Newport News, VA Satellite Location - SOLD OUT

Feb 5, 2022 - Feb 6, 2022
Location: Riverside Physical Therapy - Regional Medical Center

Pelvic Floor Level 1 - Guntersville, AL Satellite Location - SOLD OUT

Feb 5, 2022 - Feb 6, 2022
Location: Enhanced Therapy Services

Pelvic Floor Level 1 - Leavenworth, KS Satellite Location

Feb 5, 2022 - Feb 6, 2022
Location: University of Saint Mary

Pelvic Floor Level 1 - Self-Hosted

Feb 5, 2022 - Feb 6, 2022
Location: Self-Hosted Course

Pelvic Floor Level 1 - San Diego, CA Satellite Location (SOLD OUT)

Feb 5, 2022 - Feb 6, 2022
Location: FunctionSmart Physical Therapy

Pelvic Floor Level 1 - Virginia Beach, VA Satellite Location

Feb 5, 2022 - Feb 6, 2022
Location: Ivy Rehab - Virginia Beach - Town Center

Pelvic Floor Level 2A - Self-Hosted

Feb 12, 2022 - Feb 13, 2022
Location: Self-Hosted Course

Pregnancy Rehabilitation - Remote Course

Feb 12, 2022 - Feb 13, 2022
Location: Replacement Remote Course

Pelvic Floor Level 2A - Torrance, CA Satellite Course (SOLD OUT)

Feb 12, 2022 - Feb 13, 2022
Location: Women's Advantage Inc

Pelvic Floor Level 2A - Eagan, MN Satellite Course (SOLD OUT)

Feb 12, 2022 - Feb 13, 2022
Location: Twin Cities Orthopedics